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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
the voice and what happened then in his report, there it is typed. status statement of rufus w. youngblood pleaded to the same about events occurring in dallas, taxes on november 22nd and in his testimony before the warren commission. he doesn't know what it is but he looks up and in kennedy's car which is two cars that had he sees what he calls in his report not normal movements. the president appears to be tilting to the left. we know now the poignant tragic reason that kennedy was tilting to the left was because although he had been hit by one shot he couldn't fall down because president kennedy had this terribly bad back and he wore a heavy corsets and on days like the dallas day where he knew he was going to have a long hard day, he would rather around his legs and his waist of bandage in a figure reconfiguration to give him extra support. when he was hit by the first shot he goes like this and staff hit by the second shot. youngblood sees not normal movement. the president children and at the same moment he sees an agent in the second car. the secret service car rising to his feet an
a little bit of cedar flute. if you've heard cedar flute you've heard youngblood and cedar flute has become emblematic of american indian in the singular, american indian culture. i wanted to play it for you to give you an example of what might be considered traditional style because after this i'd lake to bring up two guests and play two arrangements that were created especially for this festival that bring in both the irish american and the urban indian. so this is a cedar flute song for you. (playing flute) so now that you have a little bit of powwow and a little bit of cedar flute in your ears, i would like to invite two guests up to perform for you, two arrangements which i made especially for today. first, rita lindall, rita and i are both in the same cohort as the music program at uc berkley and we've been saying for 4 years, we need to play music. so we finally made it happen. so, rita lindall, and then masuro koga. mas and i have been playing together for a very long time, so much so that we wore the same shirt without having to talk to each other about it. mas is in high demand bo
. but we spoke with a nonbeliever, lauren anderson youngblood, who thinks discrimination against atheists has by no means stopped. >> my mother taught us not to tell people that we didn't have a belief in god because she feared persecution. and many atheists today are fearful of coming out because of that discrimination. and because of the fact that they very well may lose friends or family members, they may be shunned. >> many people of faith may be troubled by the findings in our survey. for instance, three quarters of all the nones say they were raised in religious homes. very few of them say they are seeking a church that is right for them. they seem quite content to remain unaffiliated. indeed, for people in any age group, the percentage of unaffiliated when they are young remains the same as they get old. >> i think that if i have children, i think that's the same thing that i would like to teach them is that religion is important, being spiritual is important. what's not as important is to join and to go every week. >> however people interpret our survey, greg smith insists the res
. [applause] and then let us resolve that never again will we send the precious youngblood of this country to die trying to prop up military dictatorship abroad. [applause] >> the late george mcgovern at the 1972 democratic national convention. with us here in san rafael, california is stephen vittoria, director of the 2005 documentary, "one bright shining moment: the forgotten summer of george mcgovern." in addition to doing documentary, you came close to senator mcgovern. give us a thumbnail sketch of george mcgovern's like credit >> first, i want to thank you and "democracy now!" for embracing church mcgovern's life and legacy. for 40 or 50 years, the right wing in this country along with the so-called liberal court media has stomped all over his character. the man spent his life fighting for peace, fighting for justice, fighting to feed people. this is a great example of independent media, speaking truth to power. thank you. i became very close with george mcgovern. i did not want to make the film unless he was behind making the film. it would have been very difficult to do the film wi
homecoming happened at the kind of detroit joint which was in his genes. >> rodriguez: hey, youngbloods. >> i want to say hello, man. >> you're very inspiring. >> rodriguez: what's your name? >> charlie. >> i'm so excited to see you. >> awesome to meet you, man. thrilling. yes. >> a picture, too... >> rodriguez: you better hurry. >> ...because we're so excited. >> rodriguez: me, too. >> simon: and he'd been in their midst all the time. but it took 40 years for them to discover who he really was. ♪ ♪ rodriguez is 70 now and needs a little help walking. he can barely see. the world can see and hear him today as the great songwriter he's always been. but there's still one abiding mystery. why do you think it's taken 40 years? >> rodriguez: well, i... i just wasn't meant to be so lucky then, you know. i think maybe that's it. >> simon: you know, when you left here before the film was made, you were rodriguez living in downtown detroit. now, you're "rodriguez, superstar." >> rodriguez: oh. >> simon: it has a ring to it, "rodriguez superstar." >> rodriguez: oh, no. this... well, that's nice of
about militarily intervening in syria? if it's just providing additional arms youngblood the substantial amounts that are already flowing into the country, how do deal with the risks that shoulder-fired missiles, for example, that could shoot down aircraft, how do we make sure those don't show up shooting down american aircraft, israeli aircraft and so forth? so exactly what else would governor romney do? because i think this may be an important issue spent as they say, i'm glad you asked the question. let me start out by saying, the recent with russia has not worked terribly well. russia has very reluctant gone along with sanctions on event. they were the last holdout, and we water down the sanctions in order to satisfy the russians to get a deal. the european union has tougher sanctions than we do. and they just passed more this past week. we lag behind them. and impact the administration took its time approving sanctions that were initiated by the congress. but they were so determined to work through the united nations come made them so they did so yeah, we worked with the russians, n
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)